In collaboration with an unprecedented coalition of university centers across the western United States, the Salazar Center is co-hosting a new webinar series! Conservation Conversations will explore the conservation challenges of the future and identify specific policies, programs, and strategies to help secure the long-term health of the nation’s natural resources, wildlife, and landscapes, and broaden the benefits for all Americans.

The second installment of the series was hosted by University of Wyoming’s Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources and reframed conservation through an economic lens. Panelists discussed the role of conservation in stimulating investment and diversifying local economies, and how appreciating the economic contributions of conservation can help expand conservation constituencies, guide policy reforms, and inform investments to address economic declines in rural communities in the West.

Dates

Date Start Time End Time
Aug. 13, 2020 12:00 pm 1:00 pm

Contact Information

Dominique Gómez: dominique.gomez@colostate.edu

Conservation Conversations webinar series

Key Themes

  • Climate adaptation
  • Community-based conservation
  • Conservation policy
  • Diversity equity inclusion
  • Healthy landscapes

With support from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and the Wilburforce Foundation, the Salazar Center hosted a half-day workshop, as part of its second annual International Symposium for Conservation Impact, for organizations seeking to improve the success of their conservation efforts in rural areas of the western United States.

The workshop convened participants to explore their interactions with rural communities and better prepare them to be successful in that work. Together, the group identified and unpacked the challenges and opportunities that are unique to conservation advocacy work in these areas, as well as the impact of other related factors—such as rural economic transitions, private lands, and human-wildlife conflict—on these efforts.

We highlighted powerful personal stories about rural community collaboration from a diversity of stakeholders, alongside research on environmental issues in rural western communities, including the Do’s and Don’ts of working on environmental issues in rural western communities and strategies for engagement, communications, issue framing, and relationship building.

You can view the complete agenda, as well as variety of recordings from the virtual workshop:

Watch the video playlist of the rural workshop
This playlist provides the complete recording of the workshop in three parts.

Recordings from the workshop include:

  • Part 1, featuring Kendall Edmo (Blackfeet Tribe), Angelina Gonzalez-Aller (Center for Large Landscape Conservation), and Ben Alexander (Resources Legacy Fund)
  • Part 2, featuring Teresa Martinez (Continental Divide Trail Coalition), Simon Sotelo (New Mexico Wild), and Dr. Robert Bonnie (Duke University)
  • Part 3, highlighting lessons learned and common themes
  • Check out the graphic recording of the event, as well as a timelapse, by Heartwood Visuals

Dates

Date Start Time End Time
Sep. 16, 2020 1:00 pm 4:30 pm

Contact Information

Dominique Gómez: dominique.gomez@colostate.edu

Key Themes

  • Community-based conservation
  • Connectivity
  • Crossing boundaries
  • Diversity equity inclusion
  • Healthy landscapes
  • Large landscapes

In this session of our Connecting for Conservation webinar series, we discussed the continuing imprint redlining – a system of historical racism in housing – has on urban tree canopy in cities throughout the United States. We also explored the important role trees play in urban cooling and resilience and innovative programs to improve tree cover and green spaces in vulnerable communities.

Pictured above: historic map of redlining in Los Angeles, courtesy of the Mapping Inequality project by the Digital Scholarship Lab at University of Richmond.

Cate Mingoya

Director of Capacity Building, Groundwork

Learn more about Cate

 

Dr. Jeremy Hoffman

Chief Scientist, Science Museum of Virginia

Learn more about Dr. Hoffman

 

 

Dates

Date Start Time End Time
July 9, 2020 12:00 pm 1:00 pm

Contact Information

Dominique Gómez: dominique.gomez@colostate.edu

Key Themes

  • Community-based conservation
  • Diversity equity inclusion
  • Resiliency
  • Urban nature

We know that healthy natural systems support healthy communities, and in this session of Connecting for Conservation, two experts panelists discussed the science and research behind the importance of connection to nature for human health and well-being, and why and how we can ensure more equitable access.

Photo by Theo Stroomer, courtesy of The Trust for Public Land.

Benita Hussain

Director, 10 Minute Walk, The Trust for Public Land

Learn more about the 10 Minute Walk Campaign

 

Dr. Scott D. Sampson

Executive Director and William R. and Gretchen B. Kimball Chair of the California Academy of Sciences

Learn more about Dr. Sampson

 

 

Dates

Date Start Time End Time
June 11, 2020 12:00 pm 1:00 pm

Contact Information

Dominique Gómez: dominique.gomez@colostate.edu

Key Themes

  • Community-based conservation
  • Diversity equity inclusion
  • Resiliency
  • Urban nature

Building trust is critical to successful conservation programs. Understanding the communities you are working in, their beliefs and histories, is critical to establishing a solid foundation, along with careful thinking on your approach to engagement. In this Connecting for Conservation session, two expert practitioners discussed their work and shared best practices.

Photo courtesy of Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, originally appearing on Yale Environment 360.

Robert Bonnie

Executive in Residence, Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, Duke University

Learn more about Robert

 

Dr. Stephanie Malin

Associate Professor, Sociology, Colorado State University

Learn more about Dr. Malin

 

 

Dates

Date Start Time End Time
May 14, 2020 12:00 pm 1:00 pm

Contact Information

Dominique Gómez: dominique.gomez@colostate.edu

Key Themes

  • Community-based conservation
  • Connectivity
  • Crossing boundaries
  • Diversity equity inclusion
  • Healthy landscapes
  • Indigenous conservation

In this installment of the Connecting for Conservation webinar series, our goal was to share some much-needed warmth and levity – and useful information, too! – in light of the circumstances surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic. We explored the power of stories to win support for conservation projects and how narratives can be framed in ways that capture the attention of the public.

The webinar featured storytellers Valerie Tutson and Luke Runyon.

Valerie Tutson

Professional Storyteller and Founding Director, Rhode Island Black Storytellers

Learn more about Valerie

 

Luke Runyon


Colorado River Basin Reporter, KUNC

Learn more about Luke

 

 

Dates

Date Start Time End Time
April 16, 2020 12:00 pm 1:00 pm

Contact Information

Dominique Gómez: dominique.gomez@colostate.edu

Key Themes

  • Community-based conservation
  • Connectivity
  • Conservation funding and finance
  • Diversity equity inclusion
  • Resiliency

This installment of the Connecting for Conservation webinar series was the second in a two-part series on indigenous approaches to conservation. It served as a continuation of a conversation around Native American heritage and tribal stewardship, which began at the Salazar Center’s 2019 symposium and featured Loren BirdRattler and Terry Tatsey of the Blackfeet Nation and Eli Enns of the Nuu-chah-nulth First Nation.

The webinar featured Dina Gilio-Whitaker, Dr. Clint Carroll, and Dr. Dominique David-Chavez in a discussion of Indigenous approaches to conservation.

Dina Gilio-Whitaker

Lecturer, American Indian Studies, California State University San Marcos

Learn more about Dina

 

Dr. Clint Carroll

Associate Professor, Native American and Indigenous Studies, CU Boulder

Learn more about Dr. Carroll

 

Dr. Dominique David-Chavez

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Native Nations Institute, and Colorado State University Department of Forest & Rangeland Stewardship

Learn more about Dr. David-Chavez

 

 

Dates

Date Start Time End Time
March 5, 2020 12:00 pm 1:00 pm

Contact Information

Dominique Gómez: dominique.gomez@colostate.edu

Key Themes

  • Community-based conservation
  • Diversity equity inclusion
  • Healthy landscapes
  • Indigenous conservation

This inaugural Connecting for Conservation webinar series was the first in a two-part series on indigenous approaches to conservation. It served as a continuation of a conversation around Native American heritage and tribal stewardship, which began at the Salazar Center’s 2019 symposium and featured Loren BirdRattler and Terry Tatsey of the Blackfeet Nation and Eli Enns of the Nuu-chah-nulth First Nation.

The webinar featured Dr. Beth Rose Middleton and Sara Smith in a discussion of indigenous leadership on climate change.

Dr. Beth Rose Middleton

Associate Professor of Native American Studies, UC Davis

Learn more about Dr. Middleton

 

 

Sara Smith

Midwest Tribal Climate Science Liaison, College of Menominee Nation 

Learn more about Sara

 

 

Dates

Date Start Time End Time
Feb. 20, 2020 1:00 pm 2:00 pm

Contact Information

Dominique Gómez: dominique.gomez@colostate.edu.

Key Themes

  • Climate adaptation
  • Climate change
  • Diversity equity inclusion
  • Healthy landscapes
  • Indigenous conservation

The Center’s 2020 International Symposium on Conservation Impact highlighted best-in-class examples in North American cities of enhancing natural systems to improve community health and support climate resilience. The symposium featured a broad group of policy leaders, practitioners, and researchers who work in and around cities.

You can view the complete agenda, as well as variety of recordings from the virtual event:

Connectivity Challenge Prize Finalist Pitch Event

Watch Borderlands Restoration Network win the prize, and read more about their winning project.

Working and Communicating Effectively in Rural Communities Workshop
Symposium on Conservation Impact
Watch the symposium playlist on YouTube
This playlist includes videos of each speaker and panel, plus special announcements from throughout the day.

Recordings from the symposium include:

Thank you to our sponsors and partners!

The symposium was made possible with support from our sponsors, Jim Kelley and Amie Knox; Trinchera Blanca Foundation, an affiliate of The Moore Charitable Foundation, founded by Louis Bacon; Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO); Dig Studio; and Colorado Parks and Wildlife,  as well as a number of generous individual donors.

We would also like to thank our partners, who helped us craft a meaningful and substantive symposium. They include The Trust for Public Land, the National Wildlife Federation, the City and County of Denver, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, and the Wilburforce Foundation.

      The Trust for Public Land     National Wildlife Federation    Denver Parks and Recreation   Wilburforce Foundation      William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

Contact Information

Catie Boehmer: catie.boehmer@colostate.edu

Sponsored by Trinchera Blanca Foundation, Great Outdoors Colorado, Dig Studio, and Colorado Parks and Wildlife

Key Themes

  • Climate adaptation
  • Climate change
  • Connectivity
  • Diversity equity inclusion
  • Healthy landscapes
  • Resiliency
  • Urban nature

The inaugural Salazar Center International Symposium on Conservation Impact established a forum to track, incent, recognize, and reward progress on conservation challenges across North America. It convened 200+ thought leaders from the arenas of conservation policy, practice, and research around the theme of landscape connectivity. Attendees represented 10 different city, county, state, and national agencies; 40 non-profit organizations and universities; and 19 funders from 15 states, Canada, and Mexico. Together, we explored opportunities to connect and collaborate across urban and rural, public and private, and wild and working lands; how landscape-scale conservation is critical to environmental and human health; and what opportunities and challenges exist surrounding their conservation and stewardship.

The Center also launched its first competitive prize for conservation impact at the symposium. The prize is one way in which the Salazar Center is pursuing bold new incentives to advance impactful, community-based conservation partnerships that support conservation at scale.

Speakers included:

Dates

Date Start Time End Time
Sep. 24, 2019 8:00 am 6:00 pm

Location

McNichols Civic Center Building

144 W Colfax Ave, Denver, CO 80202

Key Themes

  • Biodiversity
  • Climate change
  • Connectivity
  • Conservation funding and finance
  • Conservation policy
  • Crossing boundaries
  • Diversity equity inclusion
  • Healthy landscapes
  • Indigenous conservation
  • Large landscapes